Packing Our Emotional First Aid Kit

An Emotional Emergency Kit is a set of emotional wellness tools and can include some of the following activities that you can share with your family or class to build emotional resilience and connection.


Emotional Emergency Kit

An Emotional Emergency Kit (just like a Disaster Emergency Kit) is designed to provide the necessary supplies to support you through a difficult and challenging situation. Right now we are all affected in some way by the ongoing pandemic and the impact on health concerns, school learning environments, and economic instability. The added uncertainty of this election season and continued focus on national racial inequities is likely causing increased anxiety and the need for extra support for ourselves and our youth.

An Emotional Emergency Kit is a set of emotional wellness tools and can include some of the following activities that you can share with your family or class to build emotional resilience and connection:

Emotional Food/Water: Daily nurturance includes doing at least one activity each day that promotes self-care like wearing comfy clothes, taking a bubble bath, eating your favorite food for a meal, or having a cup of a warm beverage like tea.

Emotional Flashlight: Identify something that reminds you to focus on hope. This tool could include creating a family mantra or motto that you can recite, or an affirmation statement. This is one we heard this week from poet Cleo Wade: I am showing love for myself by choosing hope no matter what.”

Emotional Batteries:  Sleep hygiene is important for overall well-being. Try adding an extra 30 minutes to sleep time and include a soothing activity before bed, such as listening to relaxing music, writing a gratitude list, or reading an inspirational book.

Emotional Cell Phone: Stay socially connected by making a list of people you can call for support, and check in regularly with them.

Emotional Charger: Taking a 10-15 minute break when feeling overwhelmed can reduce feelings of being overwhelmed. A time-out can include taking a walk or run, having a laugh, praying, or singing.

Emotional Self-check-in Tool:  It can be helpful to engage in activities that help you identify your feelings so you can take steps that promote wellness: journal writing, art projects, meditation, or talking to trusted friends. We have a favorite guide to help with this

Emotional Blankets: Spend time doing something that makes you feel good, like playing with pets, reading favorite books, playing games, dancing, sports, and spending time with friends and loved ones.

Emotional Map:  Having an overall goal for moving through this time with as much ease as possible can be beneficial. Try creating a visual image of your primary goal as a family, class, or group at this time (e.g. staying connected, maintaining balance, minimizing stress, practicing gratitude, etc.). What is your vision for yourself at the end of this journey? 

Just like we prepare for physical disasters, this is a moment when we can emotionally prepare for the inevitable challenges ahead. Instead of waiting to react, we invite you to talk with your family or class about what you all need to practice to get through this time. What is working for you right now that we missed?

 

If you are looking for some community, emotional emergency kit skills, and even, dare I say, play and joy this month, come join us in one of our programs for girls, families, or professionals.

Programs for girls, families, and professionals

Plus, more Free Resources to keep our girls (and ourselves) resilient and connected. 

 

  1. Carol Parks

    This is so powerful and inspiring. How can I contact you directly?

    Reply
    • Dorothy Ponton, Digital Marketing Manager

      Hi Carol, Thanks for asking, I’ve emailed you.

      Reply
  2. Judy Reid

    Thanks Simone for the Wade quote and the clever wording on the emotional emergency kit. What a wonderful concept!
    I felt peace of mind just reading it.
    Hang in there!

    Reply

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